INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY

This is the third of five blog posts that present my takeaways from Charles Spurgeon’s sermon entitled “The Time is Short.”  The link to the sermon is The Spurgeon Library | The Time is Short

In this post, I will briefly discuss the second point in Spurgeon’s sermon which is that the expression “the time is short” suggests that, even though the opportunity may not be as great as in the past, there is still time to “to follow out the work of faith, the patience of hope, and the labour of love.”    

I hope you take the time to read this blog.  But, if time is short for you, at least ponder the below questions.

Do I fully appreciate that no matter my season of life, God can use me to make a difference in His eyes?  If I don’t, what can I do to arrive at such an appreciation?  Why is it important for me to know that God can always use me?

Does the way I spend my time cause me to have confidence in my salvation so I look forward to Jesus second coming?  If this isn’t the case, what changes do I need to make? Should I revisit my conversion event?

Am I “sold out” to Jesus Christ?  Am I willing to pay the price to be “sold out” to Jesus Christ?  If not, why not?  What needs to change for me to be “sold out” to Jesus Christ?

DISCUSSION OF THE SECOND POINT – THE SUGGESTIONS

There are three fundamental takeaways from the second point.

First, even though our days may be short, they can still be productive in service to the Lord:

Our days on earth are as a shadow; but happily, they may be radiant, and leave a trail of light behind them. Might not even God himself look down, with a measure of admiration, from his eternal dwelling-place on the career I have sketched? The slender threads of fleeting moments are worked up into the goodly fabric of a complete biography.

For me, this takeaway raises the questions below.

Do I fully appreciate that no matter my season of life, God can use me to make a difference in His eyes?  If I don’t, what can I do to arrive at such an appreciation?  Why is it important for me to know that God can always use me?

Second, the believer who invests his time well will look forward to the return of Jesus:

Endowed with one talent, — TIME, — and that endowment sparse; the gift so prized as to be economized; so looked after that it is never squandered; so usefully employed that its judicious expenditure can never be vainly regretted: so profitably invested that the faithful steward welcomes the advent of his Lord, ready and anxious to give in his account. This is as I would wish to be.

This takeaway raises the following questions for every person to ask.

Does the way I spend my time cause me to have confidence in my salvation so I look forward to Jesus second coming?  If this isn’t the case, what changes do I need to make? Should I revisit my conversion event?

Third, Spurgeon says that a believer ought to want to glorify God no matter what it takes:

Oh, for men and women with one ambition, and one enterprise, to glorify the Lord! Ardently do I desire that God should be glorified in me, and that not in a small measure. I have prayed, and I do pray him to make the most he can make of me, — to do it anyhow. What if, to this end, I must be cast into the furnace of affliction, and suffer for his sake? What if my honour should be trampled in the dust, and my name become a hissing and a by-word, and a reproach among the sons of men, while the witness of my integrity is on high? Here am I, 0 Lord, to do aught, to bear aught, that thou shaft bid! Only do get as much glory to thine own name as can be got out of such a poor creature as I am. Who will join me in this petition?

The relevant questions generated by this takeaway are below.

Am I “sold out” to Jesus Christ?  Am I willing to pay the price to be “sold out” to Jesus Christ?  If not, why not?  What needs to change for me to be “sold out” to Jesus Christ?

CONCLUSION

There are three major takeaways from Spurgeon’s point that the expression “the time is short” suggests that, even though the opportunity may not be as great as in the past, there is still time to “to follow out the work of faith, the patience of hope, and the labour of love.”   These takeaways are below.

First, even though our days may be short, they can still be productive in service to the Lord.

Second, the believer who invests his time well will look forward to the return of Jesus.

Third, a believer ought to want to glorify God no matter what it takes to be “sold out” to Jesus.

IF YOU ARE UNSURE ABOUT YOUR SALVATION

If you are unsure about your salvation, you need to check out my new (published in October, 2021) book The Salvation Meter: Biblical Self-Diagnostic Tests to Examine Your Salvation and Spiritual Growth (book link at Xulon Press: https://www.xulonpress.com/bookstore/bookdetail.php?PB_ISBN=9781662828638 ).  At Amazon the book link is  https://www.amazon.com/Salavation-Meter-Biblical-Self-Diagnostic-Spiritual/dp/1662828632 .  I also have  website in which I am updating the content in the book.  The link to my website for the book is https://thesalvationmeter.com .

IF YOU ARE NOT A CHRISTIAN

If you are reading this post and are not a Christian, unless God intervenes, your eternal destination is hell.  But, your destiny can change.  Today can be the day of your salvation. 

Please see my blog (https://stevebelsheim.com/2020/04/20/for-god-so-loves-you-2/) for a description of how you can be saved and a more concise description at my (https://stevebelsheim.com/2020/10/20/there-is-hope-even-when-there-seems-to-be-no-hope-2/ ).

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